Work At Home Scams List

Work At Home Scams

 

 

With the pandemic, many of us lost our jobs and money is tight. Scam artists view this as a huge opportunity. We are trying to make ends meet and a work at home business might sound like just the thing.

By the way, it is the right thing, but with the right team!

Scammers know we are vulnerable at this time and they will take advantage of it. They will offer a work at home opportunity with a full refund promise if you don’t succeed.

They are basically all the same “empty promises”. Some will even ask you for a fee to join and next thing you know, your credit card is charged without your permission for additional charges that were never disclosed to you.

 

 

Any online business opportunity that promises guaranteed income, large returns, or a “proven system” is likely a scam. If you pay for the so-called opportunity, you’re then often asked to pay even more: for business coaching or mentoring services to guarantee or increase your business’s success. The money you spend on those extra coaching services is almost always more money down the drain. ~ Federal Trade Commission

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Look at it this way:

 

If you were to start an offline business you will have to invest your time, effort, and money.

Well, that is basically the same thing for online business. You can start an online business with no money and like any business, you will have to work it to make it grow! 

They are no such thing as a Get-Rich-Quick.

 Find Out If A Company Is A Scam!

 

Operation Empty Promises:

Job and Business Opportunity Scams – Federal Trade Commission



 

Work At Home Victim Video

Don’t Be A Victim

 

 

 

 

 

10 Things You Can Do To Avoid Fraud

FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION

 
 

Crooks use clever schemes to defraud millions of people every year. They often combine new technology with old tricks to get people to send money or give out personal information. Here are some practical tips to help you stay a step ahead.

 

 

  1. Spot imposters. Scammers often pretend to be someone you trust, like a government officiala family membera charity, or a company you do business with. Don’t send money or give out personal information in response to an unexpected request — whether it comes as a text, a phone call, or an email.  
  2. Do online searches. Type a company or product name into your favorite search engine with words like “review,” “complaint” or “scam.” Or search for a phrase that describes your situation, like “IRS call.” You can even search for phone numbers to see if other people have reported them as scams.
  3. Don’t believe your caller ID. Technology makes it easy for scammers to fake caller ID information, so the name and number you see aren’t always real. If someone calls asking for money or personal information, hang up. If you think the caller might be telling the truth, call back to a number you know is genuine.
  4. Don’t pay upfront for a promise. Someone might ask you to pay in advance for things like debt relief, credit and loan offers, mortgage assistance, or a job. They might even say you’ve won a prize, but first you have to pay taxes or fees. If you do, they will probably take the money and disappear. 
  5. Consider how you pay. Credit cards have significant fraud protection built in, but some payment methods don’t. Wiring money through services like Western Union or MoneyGram is risky because it’s nearly impossible to get your money back. That’s also true for reloadable cards (like MoneyPak or Reloadit) and gift cards (like iTunes or Google Play). Government offices and honest companies won’t require you to use these payment methods.

6. Talk to someone. Before you give up your money or personal information, talk to someone you trust. Con artists want you to make decisions in a hurry. They might even threaten you. Slow down, check out the story, do an online search, consult an expert — or just tell a friend.

7. Hang up on robocalls. If you answer the phone and hear a recorded sales pitch, hang up and report it to the FTC. These calls are illegal, and often the products are bogus. Don’t press 1 to speak to a person or to be taken off the list. That could lead to more calls.

8. Be skeptical about free trial offers. Some companies use free trials to sign you up for products and bill you every month until you cancel. Before you agree to a free trial, research the company and read the cancellation policy. And always review your monthly statements for charges you don’t recognize.

9. Don’t deposit a check and wire money back. By law, banks must make funds from deposited checks available within days, but uncovering a fake check can take weeks. If a check you deposit turns out to be a fake, you’re responsible for repaying the bank.

10. Sign up for free scam alerts from the FTC at ftc.gov/scamsGet the latest tips and advice about scams sent right to your inbox.


Work At Home Scams List

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4 thoughts on “Work At Home Scams List

  1. Hi,

    thank you for these tips on how to recognize scams. Yeah, I’ll be looking out for when platforms guaranteed income, large returns, or a “proven system”.

    I hadn’t seen it this way, but you’re right when you say that with this pandemic we’re vulnerable and scammers have become even more creative trying to take away our hard earn cash.

    1. Hi Ann, Yes we have to be more vigilant, scammers are right around the corner waiting on us!  Very important to do our research.  What sounds too good to be true most likely it is!  

  2. Hey,

    Thanks so much for sharing this article. I’ve really been enlightened.

    There’re so many scams out there that it’s very difficult to trust… The problem is that there are also Legit companies, but they are paying the price for others…

    This is why it’s always good to make your own research as suggested by the Federal Trade Commission. Type the word “Complaint”, “review” etc on Google about a company before buying anything…

    I was really sad watching the 2nd video, about that woman who lost $25,000 from a scam !! 

    Thanks again for sharing. It’ll help a lot of people

    Cheers

    1. Hey back at you! Thanks for the comment.  Exactly!  They are some good legit companies but they pay the price as you said.  We have to be vigilant and do our due diligence before signing up with a company.  Indeed this is very sad watching the video about that woman who lost $25,000.  I posted it hoping that it can help people to be more aware of those scammers.

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